Cross-Cultural Issues in Bioethics: The Example of Human Cloning

By Heiner Roetz | Go to book overview

Chinese Ethics and Human Cloning:
A View from Hong Kong

Gerhold K. Becker

Abstract: The paper addresses the issue of human cloning from a Hong
Kong perspective within the broader context of considerations about the
implications of cultural differences for global bioethics. The tendency,
particularly in contemporary ethical discourse in Hong Kong, to interpret
cultural issues in bioethics as a vindication of ethical pluralism and of the
need to replace bioethics in the singular with culture-based alternatives is
examined and traced back to the formation of what has become the domi-
nant bioethical model, principlism. It is argued that the alternative ver-
sions of bioethics under discussion fail due to conceptual inconsistencies
and an impoverished understanding of culture at the intersection between
traditional forms of life and the conditions of modern biomedicine. Recov-
ering the rich texture of cultural diversity in Hong Kong as the framework
for ethical discourse, the paper explores four major lines of argument for
a ban on human cloning that are largely endorsed across Hong Kong
society.

Key Words: Cloning, Bioethics, Personhood, Human dignity, Principlism,
Culture, Chinese ethics, Confucianism, Hong Kong, Reprodu–ctive tech-
nology.

The search for commonalities in cross-cultural bioethics starts from the assumption of substantive cultural differences. Investigations of such differences have produced an expanding body of research that raises some stimulating questions about the cultural basis of bioethics and its implications for universal moral norms. Unless explorations in moral diversity are to serve mainly historical or anthropological interests, the discovery of cultural bases of divergent moralities seems to question the universality of ethical standards. Linking up with the larger philosophical question about the role of reason in post-modern times, cultural issues in bioethics have been taken as vindication of ethical pluralism and the need to substitute culture-based alternatives for bioethics in the singular, or at least for what is widely regarded as its dominant version in the West.

In such a context, I have been asked to contribute to this symposium specifically from a Hong Kong perspective. The expectations behind this request seem to be, firstly, that Hong Kong as a socio-political entity can claim a sufficiently recognisable cultural identity that warrants

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cross-Cultural Issues in Bioethics: The Example of Human Cloning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.