Cross-Cultural Issues in Bioethics: The Example of Human Cloning

By Heiner Roetz | Go to book overview

The Debate on Human Cloning:
Some Contributions from the Jewish Tradition
Y. Michael Barilan

Abstract: Contemporary rabbinic discourse on cloning is limited to non-
procreative cloning and to the use of cloning technology to overcome an
otherwise insurmountable infertility problem between a husband and wife.
Without exception Jewish sources do not grant moral status to extracor-
poreal pre-embryos which are not destined for future implantation and
which have not reached the stage of formation. Therefore, the creation of
such pre-embryos, even by means of cloning, is permissible and even
necessary for the sake of finding a cure for diseases. Some rabbis prefer
cloning to other modes of infertility treatment, since cloning does not
require the donation of genetic material from a third party. In this paper I
analysis the bioethical problem of cloning in the light of the rabbinic
literature. I argue that the most problematic aspect of cloning is the indi-
rect, but potentially serious, pressure on women to accept technologies of
infertility which are far from innocuous. I also argue from the Jewish
experience that overt stigmatisation of cloning might bring about dis-
crimination and even abuse of cloned humans, should this practice be-
come prevalent. Although Jewish law is quite liberal with regard to clon-
ing, Judaism does not try to “preach to the nations”. Rabbis and Israeli
legislators respect communities who object to cloning, but they also ex-
pect tolerance towards Jewish receptivity to this technology.

Key Words: Judaism, Halakha, Human cloning, Infertility treatment,
Family relationships, Human dignity, Gender


1. Cloning: the Problems in Hand
Human cloning typically comprises a few basic components:
i. Artificial steps (imitating natural processes) and manipulation (of
ii. natural processes) in human procreation. ii. Creation of human beings that are genetically (chromosomally) identical to other humans.
iii. Alteration of the human genome.
iv. Technology, research and development.
v. Socio-cultural responses to clones and cloning: does he/she have parents or siblings? What is the nature of this parenthood or siblingship?

-311-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cross-Cultural Issues in Bioethics: The Example of Human Cloning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.