Jobs Aren't Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-Income Families

By Roberta Rehner Iversen; Annie Laurie Armstrong | Go to book overview

Foreword

SUSAN GEWIRTZ, Annie E. Casey Foundation

MORE THAN ONE out of four American working families (9.2 million families) now earn wages so low that they have difficulty surviving financially and providing a secure future for their families. Twenty million children live in these families (Waldron, Roberts, & Reamer, 2004). As stated in our 2005 KIDS COUNT Data Book essay, the Annie E. Casey Foundation has “long believed that the most powerful approach to altering the future of our nation's most disadvantaged kids is to enhance the financial security of their parents in the present” (Annie E. Casey Foundation, p. 5). At the same time, there has been growing media and scholarly attention to the changing economy due to globalization, demand for workers with higher skills, decreasing wage mobility at the lower end of the wage scale, and the increasing percentage of jobs that do not offer health benefits or paid sick leave. And although there is a sense of growing insecurity even among middle-class workers, low-wage workers and their families are particularly vulnerable to these labor market forces. Recent publications have chronicled the struggle of longterm welfare recipients to join the mainstream economy and the challenges facing workers who work at jobs that pay the minimum wage.

In 1998, when the research described in this book was begun, there was considerable and important research being initiated related to the impacts of welfare reform on families and on the effectiveness of welfare-to-work programs. The families in the Casey Foundation's multicity, multiyear Jobs Initiative include adults who have been on welfare, but also those with a long history in the low-wage labor market, men and women returning from incarceration, single-parent families, and two-parent working families. The Annie E. Casey Foundation, through its grant-making strategy related to connecting adults to good entry-level jobs with career paths, was particularly interested in learning more about the intersection of employment training, family, work, and community. With its Jobs Initiative as the setting, the Casey Foundation supported in-depth ethnographic research to help understand family economic mobility, the impacts of adult employment on children's lives, and the ways working families connect with their communities. The research that started in two cities, Milwaukee and Seattle, soon led to an expanded research study in all five demonstration sites with twenty-five families.

Jobs Aren't Enough places the twenty-five families of this research squarely in the context of low-wage workers across the United States who are struggling to get ahead, meet the needs of their children, and find a workable balance among the many demands on their lives. The families in this book were motivated to seek out employment and training programs, to work full time, and were generally placed in or hired by firms that offered health-care benefits. The starting wage for participants in the Jobs Initiative averages $9.41 per hour (personal communication, Metis

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jobs Aren't Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-Income Families
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.