Jobs Aren't Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-Income Families

By Roberta Rehner Iversen; Annie Laurie Armstrong | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

JUST AS FAMILY economic mobility in the twenty-first century requires collaborative institutional networks, we could not have conducted the research or written this book without a rich network of contributors. We are deeply grateful to each of you.

The vision, encouragement, and facilitation of Robert Giloth and Susan Gewirtz at the Annie E. Casey Foundation, other enthusiastic and wise Foundation colleagues, and the extended support of the Foundation in the form of grants for independent research made this book possible. Although the views presented here, as well as any errors, are the authors' alone and do not necessarily represent the views of the Foundation, Susan's and Bob's sustained involvement in the ethnographic project increases the possibility that the families' experiences in and after the Foundation's national workforce demonstration program, the Jobs Initiative, will increase labor market opportunity and economic reform in the five research cities—Philadelphia, New Orleans, Milwaukee, St. Louis, and Seattle—and in other cities as well.

We are grateful to the demonstration site directors, Margaret Berger-Bradley, Darryl Burrows, Lee Crean, Laura Dresser and Carolyn Schultz, Dianne Hanna, Steve Holt, and Tom Rhodenbaugh for providing access to their informative and helpful staff members and to their workforce development partner organizations and institutions; to colleagues at Abt Associates and the New School University for sharing program evaluation findings; and ultimately to the extended family members, friends, work supervisors and colleagues, children's school administrators and teachers, local policy board members, social and human service organization staff, and others associated with the families' efforts to move up through work. Most important, the site directors and their affiliated program partners provided access to the twenty-five families at the core of this book who gave generously of their time in hopes that the lessons from their experiences will result in changes that improve the chances of families like theirs to support their families through wage work.

The research and writing of the book could not have occurred without the field and analytic expertise of the research team. First, the onsite ethnographers: Annie Laurie Armstrong in Seattle, Miriam Isabel Barrios and Melissa Burch in New Orleans, Kathe Johnson and Dr. Diane Michalski Turner in Milwaukee, Larry Morton in St. Louis, and Dr. Cynthia Saltzman and Michele Belliveau in Philadelphia. Second, the doctoral research analysts: Mona Basta, Michele Belliveau (also co-author of Chapter 6), Dr. Robert P. Fairbanks, Jr., Dr. Min Park, and Sarah Suh. Third, the competent transcribers: Christine Holmes at Penn and the staff at Bernard Z. Schantzer's firm in Philadelphia.

Our research and this book were not only made possible but also significantly enhanced by colleagues in the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University

-xi-

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