The Collaborative Public Manager

By Rosemary O'Leary; Lisa Blomgren Bingham | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Most of the chapters in this book were first presented at a research conference. They have been revised to reflect developments in the field. Without the conference, this book never would have been developed.

The Collaborative Public Management Conference, sponsored by the Maxwell School of Syracuse University, was held in 2006 at the Syracuse University Greenberg House in Washington. It was funded by the Maxwell School's Dean's Office. It was sponsored by the Collaborative Governance Initiative, a part of the Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflicts (PARC) at the Maxwell School. All the participants were experts in public management but with very different areas of expertise: leadership, personnel, law, bureaucratic politics, intergovernmental relations, conflict resolution, environmental management, emergency management, volunteerism, contracting, and information technology. Some were from the public sector, some were from the private sector, and still others were from the nonprofit sector. Some were academics, some were practitioners, and some were “pracademics”—individuals who span both worlds.

The group was united, however, by one common interest: a desire to foster new knowledge and understanding about collaborative public management. The discussions ranged from the theoretical to the practical. Cost/benefit analyses, case studies, quasi-experimental designs, and metaanalyses were placed under the microscope.

We are grateful to Catherine Gerard, codirector of PARC, who helped mastermind the conference, kept our discussions on track, and provided wise counsel based on her years as a public manager and consultant. We are also grateful to the other conference participants who did not write chapters for this book but whose comments and insights while participating in the two-and-a-half-day conference were invaluable in crafting the final product: Terry Amsler (League of California Cities), Stu Bretschneider (Syracuse University), John Bryson (University of Minnesota), Chris Carlson (Policy Consensus Initiative), Terry Cooper (University of Southern California), Barbara Crosby (University of Minnesota), Sue Faerman (State University of New York at Albany), Richard

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