Hollywood's Blacklists: A Political and Cultural History

By Reynold Humphries | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Many people have helped me during my research in one way or another. Thanks go first to Thom Andersen and NoËl Burch who copied tapes of otherwise unavailable films for me and lent me documents. To Norma Barzman, who welcomed me into her Beverly Hills apartment in August 2002 and discussed the period and her personal memories of it. To Jean Rouverol and the late Bernard Gordon who kindly gave of their time to answer questions in writing. To Elizabeth MacRae who sent me material from the papers of her late husband, blacklisted actor/writer Nedrick Young. To Anthony Slide for his encouragement and hospitality in Los Angeles.

Thanks also to the outside readers for giving the go-ahead to this project and to Paul Buhle and Joel Kovel for their support. To Dave Wagner and Tony Williams who put at my disposal the fruits of their research and were always willing to exchange ideas. Special thanks are due to Pat McGilligan who always found the time to give help and provide invaluable information.

Much of the information used in this book was gleaned from research in various archives. Special thanks go to Ned Comstock, Doheny Memorial Library, University of Southern California, who looked out material from the Jack L. Warner Papers; and to Barbara Hall, Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, who answered questions, gave advice and took invaluable initiatives in putting at my disposal material from the Special Collections. Working at the Margaret Herrick Library, in quiet and comfortable surroundings with the help of friendly staff, is one of the many pleasures of research.

I wish to thank too the staff of the American Film Institute and the Southern California Library for Social Study and Research for their hospitality during

-vii-

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Hollywood's Blacklists: A Political and Cultural History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • The Background 1
  • I - Drawing Up the Battle Lines 7
  • Introduction 9
  • 1: Hollywood and the Union Question 27
  • 2: Thewaryears, 1939-1945 40
  • 3: Hollywood Strikes, the Right Strikes Back 62
  • II - From the Hot War to the Cold War 75
  • 4: The Hearings of 1947 77
  • 5: None Shall Escape 105
  • 6: The Anti-Communist Crusade on the Screen 128
  • 7: Life (And Death) on the Blacklist 144
  • Conclusion 159
  • Archival Sources 164
  • Bibliography 166
  • Index 175
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