The Historical Jesus in Context

By Amy-Jill Levine; Dale Allison Jr. et al. | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Dale C. Allison Jr. is Errett M. Grable Professor of New Testament Exegesis and Early Christianity at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Alan J. Avery-Peck is Kraft-Hiatt Professor in Judaic Studies and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Herbert W. Basser is Professor of Religious Studies at Queen's University,

Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Calum Carmichael is Professor of Biblical Studies and Comparative Literature in the Religious Studies Program at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

Randall D. Chesnutt is William S. Banowsky Chair of Religion at Pepperdine University, Malibu, California.

Bruce Chilton is Bernard Iddings Bell Professor of Religion at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.

Wendy Cotter, C.S.J., is Associate Professor of Theology at Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

John Dominic Crossan is Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois.

Mary Rose D'Angelo is Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana.

Mark DelCogliano, Graduate Division of Religion, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Robert Doran is the Samuel Williston Professor of Greek and Hebrew in the Department of Religion at Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts.

Craig A. Evans is Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament at Acadia Divinity College, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Peter Flint is Canada Research Chair in Dead Sea Scrolls at Trinity Western University, Langley, British Columbia, Canada.

David B. Gowler is Pierce Professor of Religion at Oxford College, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Ian H. Henderson is Associate Professor of New Testament at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Teresa J. Hornsby is Associate Professor of Religion and Director of the Women and Gender Studies Program at Drury University, Springfield, Missouri.

Jonathan Klawans is Associate Professor of Religion at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Historical Jesus in Context
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 440

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.