The Historical Jesus in Context

By Amy-Jill Levine; Dale Allison Jr. et al. | Go to book overview

22
The Passover Haggadah

Calum Carmichael

The Passover Haggadah is a composition inspired by the biblical story of the Exodus. Some of it is written in Aramaic, the language of Jesus, and the rest in Hebrew. At the Last Supper, which is portrayed as a Passover meal in the Synoptic Gospels, Jesus and his disciples would have used some version of it. The word Haggadah, like the word “gospel,” means proclamation, story, and interpretation. As with so many ancient documents, it is not possible to provide much information about the dating of the various parts of the Haggadah or the oral traditions that may have contributed to them. In fact, it was not until the Middle Ages that the first formal version appeared.

The earliest extant references to the Passover seder (order [of service]), and there are many, are found in the New Testament. Paul's metaphor in 1 Corinthians, “Purge out therefore the old leaven that you may be a new lump” (5:7), refers to the purging of a house of all leavened material the evening before the seder takes place. Jesus instructs a disciple to locate a room for the Passover meal that is “furnished [with cushions]” (Mark 14:16). During the seder meal, participants recline, a posture signifying freedom and so proclaiming a central motif of the celebration, namely, liberation from slavery. Free Romans would lie, not sit, at table; leaning on their left side, they used the right hand for eating and drinking.

The eating of Matzah (unleavened bread) and the drinking from the cups of wine play central parts in the Passover celebration. It is on performing the rites associated with the bread and the wine that Jesus is said to have instituted the Eucharist. The cup of wine—Paul (1 Corinthians 10:16) uses its technical designation, “the Cup of Blessing”—that Jesus takes and over which he says a grace (Mark 14:23) corresponds to the third of the four cups at the seder. When Jesus says that he will not drink wine again until the kingdom of God comes (Mark 14:25), he is referring to the fourth cup. The seder liturgy that accompanies the drinking of the fourth cup anticipates God's universal reign. In his refusal, according to Mark's Gospel, to accept the wine offered to him at the cross (Mark 15:36), Jesus observes the rule that, between the third and fourth cups, no nonliturgical drinking (of alcohol) is permitted. The Hallel (psalms of thanksgiving) is sung after the Passover

-343-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Historical Jesus in Context
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 440

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.