The Historical Jesus in Context

By Amy-Jill Levine; Dale Allison Jr. et al. | Go to book overview

24
The Pliny and Trajan Correspondence

Bradley M. Peper and Mark DelCogliano

The tenth book of Pliny's letters (Epistulae X.1–121) is a collection of his official correspondence with Emperor Trajan. Pliny wrote the majority of these letters (Epistulae X.15–121) while he was governor of Bithynia-Pontus, a Roman maritime province bordering the southern coast of the Black Sea. Because BithyniaPontus experienced frequent problems after its annexation (66 BCE), Trajan convinced the Senate in 110 to remove the province's longtime public status and allow him to appoint a legatus Augusti pro praetore, a position in which the emperor decided both the individual to represent him and his length of term. For this new position, Trajan chose Gaius Plinius Luci filius Caecilius Secundus (61–112), commonly called Pliny the Younger to distinguish him from his famous uncle, the writer-historian Pliny the Elder (23–79). Upon his assumption of gubernatorial duties in the autumn of 110, Pliny spent the first year of his administration touring the western region of Bithynia and visiting such cities as Prusa, Nicaea, and Nicomedia.

It was only at the beginning of his second year in office, in the autumn of 111, that he visited the eastern part of his province, Pontus. From Pontus, he wrote to Trajan about a problem concerning the Christians, most likely from the seacoast city of Amisus, the inland capital of Amastris, or some city in between. The value of their correspondence extends beyond its being the sole surviving example of such communication between an emperor and a provincial governor; it is also among the earliest of the non-Christian references to Jesus and his followers (Tacitus wrote his description of Nero's persecution some five years later [An- nales XV.44]). Although these letters (Epistulae 96 and 97) do not paint a complete portrait of Jesus and the early Christian movement, they do provide an invaluable resource for both assessing the validity of the Christian accounts and reconstructing what they invariably omit. In particular, these letters provide evidence of the continued existence and development of institutions reportedly initiated by Jesus, an imperial perception of Christianity and the person of Jesus, the persecutions that the canonical Gospels portray Jesus as predicting, and how

-366-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Historical Jesus in Context
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 440

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.