Faith in Schools? Autonomy, Citizenship, and Religious Education in the Liberal State

By Ian Macmullen | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I WAS INSPIRED to write this book by the experience of leaving my native Britain—where various Christian schools had long been supported by the state and the same status was gradually being offered to schools affiliated with other faiths—and wondering why so many members of the American Civil Liberties Union were so fervently committed to the principle that not one cent of the government's money should find its way into the coffers of a religious school. I already had a keen interest in the politics and political philosophy of multicultural and multireligious societies; questions about public funding and regulation of religious schools seemed to me to offer a revealing window onto those fundamental normative issues. My conclusions in this book are, it must be conceded, broadly critical of American education policy toward religious schools, but I should like to put on record that my stance does not reflect any lack of warmth in the welcome I received in this country. Indeed, I am deeply appreciative of the support provided by many American institutions, colleagues, and friends during the last seven years.

A Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship enabled me to spend five wonderful years at Harvard, during which time my project was conceived and a doctoral dissertation written that served as the first draft of this book. Lowell House was my home for four of those years: I am grateful to Dorothy Austin and Diana Eck, co-masters of the house, and to the students and tutors who made Lowell such a stimulating and pleasant place to live and work. During my final year at Harvard, the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics gave me additional financial support and, more importantly, the most engaging intellectual community I found at Harvard. I was fortunate to have a seat at the table each week with Arthur Applbaum, Frances Kamm, Michael Blake, Sandra Badin, Noah Dauber, Kyla Ebels-Duggan, and Waheed Hussain.

My advisors at Harvard—Nancy Rosenblum, Dennis Thompson, and Glyn Morgan—were exemplary. Few graduate students enjoy the level of attention that was lavished on me by three such accomplished scholars. I also gained a great deal from conversations with fellow graduate students Carla Marie, Bryan McGraw, and Debbie Sorensen, and from meetings with two visiting fellows at Harvard whose scholarship addresses many of the same themes as my own: Stephen Macedo and Meira Levinson.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Faith in Schools? Autonomy, Citizenship, and Religious Education in the Liberal State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.