The Future Control of Food: A Guide to International Negotiations and Rules on Intellectual Property, Biodiversity, and Food Security

By Geoff Tansey; Tasmin Rajotte | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Heike Baumüller was Programme Manager, Environment and Natural Resources, at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) up to the end of 2006. Among other areas, she coordinated ICTSD's project activities on biotechnology, fisheries, trade and environment, and biodiversity-related intellectual property rights from 2000, was the Managing Editor of the ICTSD publication BRIDGES Trade BioRes, and has published on a range of issues related to trade and sustainable development. She holds a master's degree in Environmental Studies from Macquarie University, Sydney, and is now working freelance as a consultant in Cambodia.

Susan H. Bragdon is qualified in biology, resource ecology and law. She works on the conservation, use and management of biological diversity; creating compatibility between environment and agriculture; and promoting food security. She was the lawyer for the Secretariat for the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), providing legal advice to the working group handling intellectual property rights, transfer of technology, including biotechnology, and access to genetic resources. She subsequently joined the treaty Secretariat as its Legal Advisor. From 1997 to 2004 she was a senior scientist dealing with law and policy at Bioversity International (formerly the International Plant Genetic Resources Institute (IPGRI)). She currently works as a consultant for intergovernmental organizations, governments and foundations.

Peter Drahos is a Professor in Law; he is Head of Programme of the Regulatory Institutions Network at the Australian National University (ANU), Director of the Centre for the Governance of Knowledge and Development at the ANU and a Director in the Foundation for Effective Markets and Governance. He also holds a Chair in Intellectual Property at Queen Mary College, University of London. He has degrees in law, politics and philosophy and is qualified as a barrister and solicitor. He has published widely in law and the social sciences on a variety of topics including contracts, legal philosophy, telecommunications, intellectual property, trade negotiations and international business regulation.

Graham Dutfield is Professor of International Governance at the Centre for International Governance, School of Law, University of Leeds. Previously he was Herchel Smith Senior Research Fellow at Queen Mary, University of London, and Academic Director of the UNCTAD-ICTSD capacity-building project on intellectual property rights and sustainable development. He has served as consultant or commissioned report author for several governments, international organizations, United Nations agencies and non-governmental organizations, including the governments of Germany, Brazil, Singapore and the UK, the European Commission, the World Health Organization, the World Intellectual Property Organization, and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Kathryn Garforth is a law and policy researcher and consultant working in the areas of biodiversity, biotechnology, intellectual property rights and health. She has attended numerous meetings of the CBD in a number of different capacities including as an NGO representative, on the Canadian delegation and as part of the CBD Secretariat. She has consulted widely for international organizations, national institutions and donors. She earned a joint law degree and

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