Schools Betrayed: Roots of Failure in Inner-City Education

By Kathryn M. Neckerman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My first thanks are due to William Julius Wilson, who had an indelible effect on me, as on so many at Chicago during the 1980s, and who remains a beacon of scholarly integrity and engagement. Without his steady support throughout graduate school and beyond, this research could never have been carried out. The project got its start in a seminar taught by Mary Brinton, Thomas DiPrete, and David Grusky. Along with Brinton and Wilson, George Steinmetz provided valuable guidance on the dissertation that resulted. As the only historian on my committee, James Grossman brought to bear his extensive knowledge of Chicago, and made a key suggestion, although he didn't put it quite this way: do good sociology instead of bad history.

The Spencer Foundation provided crucial support with a Dissertation Fellowship, followed later by a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. Along with funding, Spencer is wise enough to bestow connections to the community of education researchers, both junior and senior, and I gained a great deal from the stimulating meetings of Spencer fellows hosted by the National Academy of Education. At Columbia, the Department of Sociology offered practical support, and Monica Gisolfi, Jennifer Lee, Paolo Parigi, Kat Rakowsky, Colby Ristow (Chicago), and Mark Wilkins (Penn) all provided resourceful research assistance; Anthony Browne and Kathy Kaufman also worked with me on related papers. I am grateful as well to staff at the Chicago Historical Society (now the Chicago History Museum), the University of Chicago Special Collections, the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies (now part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania), and the Gottesman Libraries at Teachers College, Columbia University.

A number of people have read all or part of the manuscript at some point during its passage. I particularly want to thank Peter Bearman,

-xi-

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Schools Betrayed: Roots of Failure in Inner-City Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Urban Decline 11
  • Chapter Two - Labor Markets 32
  • Chapter Three - Communities and Cultures 60
  • Chapter Four - Racial Segregation and Inequality 81
  • Chapter Five - Vocational Education 107
  • Chapter Six - Remedial Education 127
  • Chapter Seven - Classroom Dynamics 152
  • Conclusion 172
  • Appendix A - Quantitative Evidence 185
  • Appendix B - Some Historical Evidence About Language Styles and Schooling 193
  • Notes 197
  • Selected Bibliography 243
  • Index 253
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