Slavery on Trial: Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture

By Jeannine Marie Delomnard | Go to book overview

notes

Abbreviations
AASAmerican Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass.
MHSMassachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Mass.

Introduction
1. References to “the American reading public,” “Northern readers,” and the like throughout this study are intended to be inclusive, given that in antebellum America “reading” could imply communal as well as individual encounters with texts, often involving the illiterate and the “semi-literate.” See McHenry, Forgotten, 4–8, 10– 14. The iconographic representations of slavery and the law that frame the current study serve as a reminder of the many points of entry by which such “readers” could access the print debate over slavery. On the target audiences of those on both sides of the slavery debate, see Wyatt-Brown, “Proslavery.”
2. Douglass, Narrative, 30; Jacobs, Incidents, 2; Weld, American Slavery, 9.
3. Douglass, My Bondage, 367.
4. Thomas Auld qtd. in A. C. C. Thompson, “Narrative,” 29.
5. A. C. C. Thompson, “To the Public.”
6. Tocqueville, Democracy, 157.
7. Sewall qtd. in Abner C. Goodell Jr., “John Saffin,” 85 (n. 3).
8. Saffin, Brief and Candid Answer. On the exchange, see Sidney Kaplan, “Samuel Sewall”; Towner, “Sewall-Saffin Dialogue”; Peterson, “Selling.”
9. It remains unclear as to whether “the Negro” mentioned by Sewall in connection with his essay is the Adam Negro of Saffin's pamphlet. See Sidney Kaplan, “Samuel Sewall,” 35–39. Adam Negro's Tryall is identified as the “first slave narrative” in Starling, Slave Narrative, 50. The citation, however, refers to the “Narrative” appended to Saffin's pamphlet as reproduced in Abner C. Goodell, “John Saffin,” 103–12. See also Foster, Witnessing, 29–32; Andrews, To Tell, 19.
10. Saffin, Brief and Candid Answer, 105, 111 (emphasis omitted).
11. Ibid., 106.
12. Qtd. in Wise, Heavens, 182. On textual variants, see ibid., 185–91. For further discussion of the Mansfield decision and its impact, see Cover, Justice, 16–17, 87–88, 91; Hoare, Memoirs, 69–94.

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Slavery on Trial: Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I: Banditti and Desperadoes, Incendiaries and Traitors 33
  • 1: The Typographical Tribunal 35
  • 2: Precarious Evidence 71
  • Part II: At the Bar of Public Opinion 99
  • 3: Eyewitness to the Cruelty 101
  • 4: Talking Lawyerlike about Law 125
  • 5: Representing the Slave 151
  • 6: The South's Countersuit 177
  • Conclusion - All Done Brown at Last: Illustrating Harpers Ferry 199
  • Notes 223
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 309
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