Advertising and the Mind of the Consumer: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

By Max Sutherland | Go to book overview

13 CONTINUOUS TRACKING: ARE YOU BEING
FOLLOWED?

An increasing number of advertisers now track their competitors' activities as well as their own with continuous customer surveys. These are not once a year or once a quarter surveys. They are conducted every week—on small samples each week which accumulate over the year into a large database and provide a total, continuous picture.

Every week these organizations capture, in their computers, fresh information on a new sample of consumers. The information covers all players in the market. Ideally it would cover the state of play for that week in regard to people's behavior, attitudes, brand awareness, brand image as well as direct communication effects such as advertising recall, advertising recognition and message take-out. This is then related to other infor mation such as media data (indicating which advertisers were on air during that week, at what times and at what advertising weight) along with sales and market share data.

Continuous market research technology has rapidly become accepted as the best way to accurately assess advertising effects in terms of what works and what doesn't.1 Continuous monitoring of purchase information can reveal if something worked or didn't. However, knowing if it worked is one thing, while finding out why or whynot is another. This diagnostic information also needs to be continuous and comes from continuous surveying otherwise known as continuous tracking.

Market research is traditionally characterized by the large scale, large sample survey representing a single point in time. Known as 'ad hoc' surveys, these were sometimes conducted before an ad campaign and then again after it. Any differences in key measures between these two surveys (such as in the levels of people's brand awareness, ad awareness or the brand's market share) were supposed to indicate possible effects of the advertising. This 'pre/post' survey technique, as it was known, slowly

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advertising and the Mind of the Consumer: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 366

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.