Advertising and the Mind of the Consumer: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

By Max Sutherland | Go to book overview

NOTES

About the author
1. NFO acquired MarketMind in 1998. The brand was later sold to Interpublic and eventually acquired by (and folded into) Taylor Nelson Sofres.

Part A Introduction
1. David Ogilvy, Confessions of an Advertising Man, Atheneum, NY, 1963 and

1984, p. 96.

2. Variously attributed to John Wanamaker in the USA and to Lord Lever-Hulme in the UK.
3. John Philip Jones, When Ads Work: New Proof that Advertising Triggers Sales,

Lexington, NY, 1995, p. 28.

4. William Lutz, Doublespeak, Harper Perennial, NY, 1990, p. 74.
5. Vance Packard, The Hidden Persuaders, Mackay, NY, 1957.
6. Alec Benn, The 27 Most Common Mistakes in Advertising, Amacom, NY, 1978, p. 5.
7. As Kover has pointed out: 'Copywriters have a “reputation” in the folklore of the advertising business. They are charged with defending their work and its integrity against any change, no matter how small. They do this against account management, against their own creative department managers, and often in opposition to research findings and the urging of clients.' Arthur Kover, 'Copyrighters' implicit theories of communication: an exploration', Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 21, March 1995, p. 604.
8. Jones 1995, op. cit., p. 27.
9. John Rossiter & Larry Perty, Advertising and Promotions Management, McGraw-Hill, NY, 1987, p. 558.

Chapter 1 Influencing people
1. Referring to this effect as a ' feather' is not meant to deprecate its importance. On the contrary, it is meant to give consumers an intuitive feel for why we often find it difficult to introspect on how advertising affects us. We don't feel the effect because it is below the JND (just noticeable difference), but that doesn't mean that feathers aren't important or effective. They are! If an ad has real news to convey, it can become a very big feather, in which case we don't need an explanation of the effect. Mostly, however, they are much smaller feathers.
2. William E. Baker, 'When can affective conditioning and mere exposure directly influence brand choice?', Journal of Advertising, Vol. 28, No. 4, winter 1999, pp. 31–46.

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