Karl Marx, Anthropologist

By Thomas C. Patterson | Go to book overview

Chronology
18185 May: Karl Marx born in Trier, Westphalia in the Rhineland of Prussia.
182028 November: Frederick Engels born in Barmen, Westphalia in the Rhineland of Prussia.
1830Marx enters high school in Trier.
1835Marx's essay on choosing a vocation; Marx enters the University of Bonn.
1836Marx transfers to the University of Berlin.
1837Marx writes about fragmentation of curriculum and begins to grapple with Hegel's writings.
1838Engels drops out of high school to work as unsalaried clerk in Bremen.
1841Engels joins Prussian army and attends lectures at the University of Berlin.
1842November: Marx and Engels meet at Cologne office of the Rheinische Zeitung; Engels goes to work at family textile firm in Manchester, England, where he meets Mary Burns who introduces him to English working-class life and with whom he has lifelong relationship; Engels begins collecting materials for The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845), arguably the first empirical anthropology of an urban community.
1843–4Marx resigns from the Rheinische Zeitung; marries Jenny von Westphalen; emigrates to Paris in search of employment, and writes Economic and Phil osophical Manuscripts (1844); Marx and Engels meet for second time and begin lifelong collaboration, the earliest product of which was The Holy Family (1845), a critique of the Young Hegelians.
1845–8February 1845: Marx expelled from France by the Minister of the Interior; Marx, his wife and children move to Brussels; Marx argues in Theses on Feuerbach (1845) for the importance of the practical activity of corporeal human beings as social individuals bound together by ensembles of social relations. April 1845: Engels arrives in Brussels; in The German Ideology (1845–6), Marx and Engels lay foundations of their materialist theory of history and refine the philosophical anthropology Marx sketched earlier; both devote energies to organizing workers and join the German Communist League. 21 February 1848: German Communist League publishes Marx and Engels's The Communist Manifesto. 3 March 1848: King of Belgium deports Marx, who returns to Cologne and launches the Neue Rheinische Zeitung.

-xi-

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Karl Marx, Anthropologist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chronology xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Enlightenment and Anthropology 9
  • 2: Marx's Anthropology 39
  • 3: Human Natural Beings 65
  • 4: History, Culture, and Social Formation 91
  • 5: Capitalism and the Anthropology of the Modern World 117
  • 6: Anthropology for the Twenty-First Century 145
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 219
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