Karl Marx, Anthropologist

By Thomas C. Patterson | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1. For example, the contrast between Renaissance and sixteenth-century anthropology can be drawn by the emphasis on language and then archaeology in the former and the concern with comparative ethnology in the latter (Pagden 1982; Rowe 1964, 1965).
2. Anthropology was clearly taught in different university faculties—e.g. law, theology, and medicine—by individuals with diverse backgrounds and philosophical presuppositions (Kelley 1984: 247; Vermeulen 1995). It also is doubtful that the empirical and philosophical strands were ever entirely separated in anthropology courses taught in the German states during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, judging by the content of Kant's lectures (Kant 1798/1978; Stark 2003).

Chapter 1 The Enlightenment and Anthropology
1. Jacques Roger (1963/1997: 181–204) discusses “the God of philosophers and scientists” in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. As he points out, the shift in conception was complex; describing it as solely in terms of “a growing hostility to Christianity which drove many into deism and some into outright materialism and atheism,” while accurate at one level, misses the nuances and subtleties at other levels (Bowler 1974: 161).
2. The imprimatur of the Royal Press was important for two reasons. It made the volumes official publications of the Crown. It also allowed Buffon to avoid censorship, which was a continual threat faced by his contemporaries, notably Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, and Rousseau (Fellows 1963a: 608–9).
3. Rogers (1963/1997: 259–60) describes the doctrines of preformationism and preexistence of germs in the following way. Preformationists argued that the actual generation of a living being occurred in the body because of its ensoulment by the seed of the male parent. This seed contained an entirely formed or preformed individual, and embryonic development consisted merely of the enlargement of the already existing parts. Advocates of the pre-existence of germs argued that the germ contained in the seed was not produced by the male genitor but rather by God at the beginning of the world and had merely been preserved in the adult male until the moment of development.

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Karl Marx, Anthropologist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chronology xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Enlightenment and Anthropology 9
  • 2: Marx's Anthropology 39
  • 3: Human Natural Beings 65
  • 4: History, Culture, and Social Formation 91
  • 5: Capitalism and the Anthropology of the Modern World 117
  • 6: Anthropology for the Twenty-First Century 145
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 219
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