The Anthropology of Islam

By Gabriele Marranci | Go to book overview

Index
Abbas, T. 65–6
Abdulrahim, D.
Abraham 20, 25–6
Abu Ghraib scandal 68
Abu-Lughod, L. 4, 41, 44, 46–7, 50n4, 69n18, 129; zones of theorizing 10, 11–12, 42–3, 49, 55, 57, 63, 140
Adler, P.A. and Adler, P. 86n1
Affaire du Foulard (headscarf affair, France) 57, 59, 125, 143
Afghan war 7, 62, 65, 117–18
Afshar, H. 69n8
After the Facts: Two Countries, Four Decades, One Anthropologist (Geertz) 74–5
Ahmed, A.S. 29n5, 45, 47, 48, 50n11
Ahmed, L. 118, 120, 136n1
Ahsan, M.M. 69n8
Akbar, M.J. 102n7
Al-Ahsan, A. 108
Al-Jazeera 62
Al-Nisa Women's Group (Northern Ireland) 81, 126–7; banning from local mosque 127–8
Aldrich, H. 69n6
Algeria/Algerians 5, 10, 147; fieldwork 72, 74, 79, 82; migrants 54–5, 111
Allah: definitions/interpretations 14–15
Alsayyad, N. 102n9
American Anthropologist 66
American cultural anthropology 34, 37, 90–1
Amit, V. 105
The Andaman Islanders (Radcliffe-Brown) 32
Anderson, B. 50n7, 86n4, 105–6
Andezian, S. 69n7
anthropological studies: centrality of community concept 105; and identity 89–93; methodology 6, 8, 39, 49, 140; and the 'Other' 6, 7, 55; post-September 11 59, 85–6, 145; publication 63; on ritual 24–5, see also ethnography; fieldwork
Anthropologists in the Public Sphere (González) 7
anthropology of Islam 35–50, 139; androcentric bias 122; definitions 42, 44, 46, 48, 49–50; 'exoticentrism' problem 44, 49, 53, 54, 67, 144; foundations/origins 39–40, 55; honour/shame complex interpretations 128–30; Islam/Islams debate 46, 47; or Islamic anthropology 47–8; masculinity studies 127–8, 129–30; Muslim communities 103–4; open trajectories 143–6; post-September 11 63–4; recent shift of interest 67–8; structuralist approach 40; studies of Muslim religion 38–9; Varisco's views 45–6, see also essentialism; fieldwork; gender studies
Anthropology and Religion: A Critical Introduction (Morris) 4
Anwar, M. 57, 69nn7, 8, 10
The Apology al-Kindi 32
Appadurai, A. 106, 107
Arab people: in anthropological studies 42–3; Bedouin tribes 5, 16, 19, 36, 38, 129; Berber tribes 118–19, 120–1; in fieldwork 36, 38, 73; gender issues/studies 118–21, 132–3; Islamic origins 16–19, 38, 108; migrants 54, 55; as the 'Other' 33; patriarchy

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