Beyond Tolerance: Child Pornography on the Internet

By Philip Jenkins | Go to book overview

ONE
Out of Control?

In fact, extremely few persons actually get arrested and
sent to jail, that is a myth really. There are thousands of
vhs's out there, many from 1999, thousands of people pre-
sent at this bbs [bulletin board] and millions of loli-lovers
in various countries, yet you only see a couple of persons
getting arrested, and the media writes about it like they
have been busting Al Capone.

—Godfather Corleone, Maestro board,
January 24, 2000

Over the last decade, politicians have often been agitated by the issue of Internet regulation, and they have usually couched their concerns in terms of protecting children. How can the young be kept clear of the “back alleys of the Internet,” where they might encounter disturbing adult imagery? Might children be lured online by cults or hate groups? On the other side of the debate, opponents of regulation counter that repressing overt sexual or extremist material threatens to damage access to genuinely important information or literary work. Yet throughout these charged discussions runs a consensus that regulation could work in practice; that a law passed against, say, pornography or hate propaganda might actually sweep those materials from the World Wide Web or at least keep people away from them; that, given the chance, censorship might work. But is this idea plausible? That it is not—that regulation can, in fact, achieve remarkably little—may be suggested by the easy availability on the Internet of what is probably the most reprehensible

-1-

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Beyond Tolerance: Child Pornography on the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Note on Usage ix
  • Glossary xi
  • One - Out of Control? 1
  • Two - Child Pornography 25
  • Three - Into the Net 52
  • Four - A Society of Deviants 88
  • Five - Moralities 115
  • Six - Policing the Net 142
  • Seven - Vigilantes and Militias 165
  • Eight - A Global Community 184
  • Nine - Where Next? 204
  • Abbreviations 225
  • Notes 227
  • Index 255
  • About the Author 260
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