Beyond Tolerance: Child Pornography on the Internet

By Philip Jenkins | Go to book overview

SEVEN
Vigilantes and Militias

Am I in real danger or are these people just trolls with no
LEA connection? Please guys, I need to sleep but I can't.
For the first time in my life I'm scared. I'm paranoiac,
thinking somebody will knock my door at any moment.

—R-board, June 25, 2000

Though trap sites as such might be mythical, some Web sites have acquired the reputation of being dangerous for porn enthusiasts, for reasons that might be instructive for future prevention efforts. Significantly, the most feared and effective such sites have nothing to do with government or any official agency but have rather been created by private companies or grassroots groups, which for a variety of reasons wish to remove pedophile material from the Web. Activism by private enterprise reflects frustration at the general failure of law enforcement to deal with the core of the child porn subculture. The consequence is that here, finally, we find anti-porn activists who genuinely scare the subculture. This development raises intriguing questions about the whole issue of law enforcement and criminal sanctions. If existing tactics have not achieved suppression, might we hope for more from new methods, perhaps drawing on the expertise of private companies and entrepreneurs? Mass arrests and roundups may be neither feasible nor desirable: the prisons are full enough already. But some of the innovative strategies now directed against child porn might be starting to have the deterrent effect that we have not hitherto witnessed in this elusive area. In the context of the Internet, some forms of deterrence will work far better than others, and an

-165-

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Beyond Tolerance: Child Pornography on the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Note on Usage ix
  • Glossary xi
  • One - Out of Control? 1
  • Two - Child Pornography 25
  • Three - Into the Net 52
  • Four - A Society of Deviants 88
  • Five - Moralities 115
  • Six - Policing the Net 142
  • Seven - Vigilantes and Militias 165
  • Eight - A Global Community 184
  • Nine - Where Next? 204
  • Abbreviations 225
  • Notes 227
  • Index 255
  • About the Author 260
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