On Fact and Fraud: Cautionary Tales from the Front Lines of Science

By David Goodstein | Go to book overview

Seven
The Breakthrough That Wasn't
Too Good to Be True

This chapter has its origins in a talk on the discovery of hightemperature superconductivity that I gave in 1989 as part of the Caltech Watson Lecture series, which regularly presents public lectures by Caltech professors. The subject captured my attention not only because low-temperature physics (to which superconductivity belongs) is my own research field but also because it oiFers a rare instance in which a physical phenomenon that just about everyone had always known to be impossible turned out to be not only possible but quite commonplace once a couple of persistent and enterprising researchers had ferreted out its existence. In an ideal world, no scientist could ever fail to be charmed by the realization that once again, nature's ingenuity had trumped ours. In the real world, of course, matters are a little more complicated, and the discovery was initially greeted with a certain amount of disbelief (by those who had “always known,” etc.) and consternation (by those who knew that whatever else might prove to be the case, they had not been the ones to make the discovery). But once the initial hype was over and the definitive confirmation came in, the scientific community settled down into its praiseworthy pattern of following up and amplifying on a genuinely thrilling eureka moment (my own lab was one of many that successfully replicated a number of the initial

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On Fact and Fraud: Cautionary Tales from the Front Lines of Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • One - Setting the Stage 1
  • Two - In the Matter of Robert Andrews Millikan 29
  • Three - Bad News in Biology 51
  • Four - Codifying Misconduct:Evolving Approaches in the 1990s 59
  • Five - The Cold Fusion Chronicles 69
  • Six - Fraud in Physics 97
  • Seven - The Breakthrough That Wasn't Too Good to Be True 107
  • Eight - What Have We Learned? 127
  • Appendix - Caltech Policy on Research Misconduct 135
  • Acknowledgments 147
  • Notes 149
  • Index 155
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.