Woodrow Wilson: Revolution, War, and Peace

By Arthur S. Link | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

This book is based upon the author's work over the past thirty years in private manuscript collections, governmental archives in the United States, Great Britain, France, and Germany, and other sources like newspapers. It is based also upon the monographs, biographies, and articles of a large group of colleagues who have written on Wilson and American diplomatic history and international relations in the twentieth century. Since these are all listed in William M. Leary, Jr., and Arthur S. Link's Goldentree Bibliography, The Progressive Era and the Great War, 1896–1920 (AHM Publishing Corp., 1978), there is no need to repeat that list here. This essay is designed as a guide to readers who want to explore the best and most significant sources and literature on Wilson and his foreign policies, such as would normally be available in any good library.

The basic source is Arthur S. Link et al. (eds.), The Papers of Woodrow Wilson (Princeton, N.J., 1966–), thirty volumes to the spring of 1979. Volume 27 begins the presidential series. Herein are printed and annotated all important materials (gathered from personal manuscript collections and governmental archives around the world) relating to Wilson the diplomatist and his diplomatic policies.

There is not a good major one-volume biography of Wilson. The authorized biographies, Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, 8 vols. (Garden City, N.Y., 1927–1939) and Woodrow Wilson and World Settlement, 3 vols. (Garden City, N.Y., 1923), are still useful, particularly the latter, since it was written with Wilson's collaboration.

For Wilson's foreign policies from 1913 to the outbreak of the war, the most comprehensive coverage is to be found in Arthur S. Link, Wilson: The New Freedom (Princeton, N.J., 1956).

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Woodrow Wilson: Revolution, War, and Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Wilson the Diplomatist 1
  • 2: Wilson and the Problems of Neutrality, 1914–1917 21
  • 3: Wilson and the Decisions for War 47
  • 4: Wilson and the Liberal Peace Program 72
  • 5: Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations 104
  • Bibliographical Essay 129
  • Index 133
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