Historical Dictionary of American Education

By Richard J. Altenbaugh | Go to book overview

T

TABA, HILDA (December 7, 1902–July 6, 1967), was one of the most important curriculum theorists and social studies* educators in the mid-twentieth century. A university professor for more than thirty years, she had a career that spanned a number of fields, including student evaluation, human relations, and teacher training, as well as curriculum development. Born in Estonia, where she received her B.A. (1926), she earned an M.A. from Bryn Mawr College (1927) and her Ph.D. (1933) from Teachers College, Columbia University, where she studied under William Heard Kilpatrick* and John Dewey.*

Taba worked with Ralph Tyler* in the Progressive Education Association's* Eight-Year Study* as an evaluation consultant in the 1930s, taught at the University of Chicago (1939–1945), and directed the American Council on Education's intergroup education project (1945–1948) and the University of Chicago's Center for Intergroup Education (1948–1951), before becoming professor of education at San Francisco State College, where she taught for the rest of her life.

Taba always worked closely with teachers, especially in social studies projects with Contra Costa County teachers in California in the 1950s and 1960s. She was convinced that teachers at the classroom level needed to participate in curriculum development, and her own ideas were influenced by their experiences. Taba's contributions included analyses of the structure of content, concept development, processes for inductive learning, and teaching strategies to promote critical thinking. Her most important book, Curriculum Development: Theory and Practice (1962), has become a classic in the field. The culmination of her professional career was a social studies textbook series for grades 1 to 8 that implemented her ideas and work. Posthumously named the Taba Social Science Program, the collaborative project was completed by her colleagues and published by Addison-Wesley in the 1970s. Her ideas continue to influence curriculum development and social studies education.

For a sense of Taba's contributions to curriculum development and social

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Historical Dictionary of American Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • A 1
  • B 30
  • C 67
  • D 106
  • E 118
  • F 135
  • G 152
  • H 161
  • I 180
  • J 191
  • K 202
  • L 206
  • M 221
  • N 244
  • O 265
  • P 272
  • R 308
  • S 322
  • T 358
  • U 369
  • V 374
  • W 378
  • Y 391
  • Selected Bibliography 393
  • Index 445
  • About the Editor and Contributors 483
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