Science Fiction, Canonization, Marginalization, and the Academy

By Gary Wastfahl; George Slusser | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We first wish to recognize all of the individuals who assisted in the creation and development of this volume, including Karen Bellinfante, Sidney Berger, Gladys Murphy, Sheryl Lewis, Darian Daries, Susan Korn, Karen Orchard, Eric S. Rabkin, Henry Snyder, and our anonymous peer reviewers. We also wish to thank Donald E. Palumbo and George F. Butler of Greenwood Press for their help in getting this volume into print, as well as our capable copyeditor Lynne Goetz. In response to a request for assistance, a number of distant colleagues provided suggestions for the bibliography, including Rene Beaulieu, John Boston, Steve Holland, Todd Mason, Jess Nevins, David Pringle, Robert Silverberg, Andy Sawyer, Gordon Van Gelder, Jeff VanderMeer, and Bud Webster. We finally would like to thank other friends, family members, and colleagues too numerous to name who provided needed support and encouragement during the preparation of this volume.

-vii-

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