Culture and Customs of Egypt

By Molefi Kete Asante | Go to book overview

Chronology
639–641 C.E.Arab armies arrived in Egypt from Arabia and Syria at the request of Egyptians who sought their support in ousting the Romans. General El As's forces helped to throw off the Romans but quickly consolidated his hold on the country.
658–750Ummayad Period when the ruling Islamic class was authorized from Damascus, Syria.
750–868Abbasid Period when the ruling Islamic class was directed from Baghdad. The Abbasids claimed descent from Abbas, the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad.
868–905Tulunid Period produced two major figures, Ahmad Tulun and Khumarayh Ahmad, whose authority stretched from Cairo to Cilicia.
905–935Abbasids, Second Period, the reassertion of the Baghdad rule and the expansion of Islam.
935–969Ikshids came to power and controlled both Egypt and Syria.
969–1171Fatimid leaders traced their ancestry to Fatimah, the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad, and embraced the Shi'a doctrine.
1171–1250Ayyubid Period, which was dominated by Salah ad-Din who reigned for twenty-four years. He spent eight years of

-xii-

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Culture and Customs of Egypt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword viii
  • Preface x
  • Chronology xii
  • 1: Land, People, and Historical Overview 1
  • 2: Government, Economy, Education, and Tourism 39
  • 3: Religion and Worldview 63
  • 4: Architecture and Art 77
  • 5: Social Customs and Lifestyles 95
  • 6: The Media and Cinema 117
  • 7: Literature, the Performing Arts, and Music 129
  • Glossary 157
  • Bibliography 161
  • Index 165
  • About the Author 169
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