Sports: A Reference Guide and Critical Commentary, 1980-1999

By Donald L. Deardorff II | Go to book overview

3
Sport and Education

For many of us, it is tempting to view sport as mere diversion, as an activity that is essentially nonserious, playful, and escapist. For others, it is impossible to remove sport from the realm of larger, weightier concerns. Sport is seen as an arena for proving oneself or for establishing superiority over another individual, town, state, or country. Perhaps nowhere is this spirit more evident than at the Olympics, where fans from across the globe wave flags in hopes that their athletes will bring home coveted medals from the valued athletic space that is the Olympic arena, medals that somehow signify a nation's greatness. In the case of professional leagues, sport functions both as a vehicle by which investors can make money and through which local fans can gain a fragile, somewhat indescribable, but no less real, ascendancy over those who live in other cities by vanquishing their teams on the gridiron or the diamond. Anyone living in Boston in the mid-1980s, for instance, knows that the great Celtic-Laker battles of that time were as much about imagined cultural superiority as about whose basketball team was better. A Celtic victory somehow affirmed all that was right with clam chowder, Faneuil Hall, and Cheers. Still, others insist that sport has a higher purpose, one that is purely educational and self-affirming in nature, one that exists outside the economic and political forces that provoke competition, one that is dedicated to helping people live longer, healthier lives. In my own discipline of English studies, some scholars insist that sport is a vital academic subject, one that is sometimes essential for understanding the culture in which a novel, film, or poem is produced. To an extent, then, sport is interesting because it has so many faces and has the ability to address a number of vital human needs and emotions. Not surprisingly, sport is used to fulfill several, often conflicting, functions within our current institutional framework of education, its several forms existing as a rather unwieldy, at times volatile, three-part blend. The most prominent part is the big business strand of college sports, consisting mostly of Division I football and men's basketball

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sports: A Reference Guide and Critical Commentary, 1980-1999
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1: Sport and American History 1
  • 2: Sport: Business and Law 27
  • 3: Sport and Education 57
  • 4: Sport: Ethnicity and Race 97
  • 5: Sport and Gender 115
  • 6: Sport and Literature 137
  • 7: Sport: Philosophy and Religion 163
  • 8: Sport and Popular Culture 193
  • 9: Sport and Psychology 213
  • 10: Sport: Science and Technology 245
  • 11: Sport and Sociology 273
  • 12: Sport and World History 297
  • Appendix 1 - Important Events in American Sports: 1980–2000 325
  • Appendix 2 - Halls of Fame, Libraries, Museums, Periodicals, and Web Sites 335
  • Index 343
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.