E

THE EMBEZZLER(Kenilworth, 1954)—Drama. Director: John Gilling; Producers: Robert Baker and Monty Berman; Script: John Gilling; Cinematography: Jonah Jones; Music: John Lanchberry; Cast: Charles Victor (Henry Paulson), Zena Marshall (Mrs. Forrest), Cyril Chamberlain (Johnson), Leslie Weston (Piggott), Avice Landone (Miss Ackroyd), Peggy Mount (Mrs. Larkin), and Michael Craig (Dr. Forrest).

The Last Holiday, * which was released four years before The Embezzler, is concerned with a middle-aged man, believing that he has little time to live, changes his life completely by resigning from his job and taking off to a seaside resort, determined to make full use of his remaining time. The Embezzler tells a similar story, only this time the victim is fifty-four-year-old Henry Paulson, a bank clerk in a loveless marriage with a nagging wife. When his doctor tells him that he has less than two years to live, he buys a ticket to France. However, Paulson's bank manager catches him stealing money from the bank to finance his adventure and Paulson is forced to hide out in a boarding house in the seaside resort of Eastbourne. At the boarding house, Paulson assists a young wife, Mrs. Forrest, who is being blackmailed by Johnson, her former lover. When Paulson steps in to protect her, he succumbs to a fatal heart attack.

This is another low-budget, unpretentious drama from Robert S. Baker and Monty Berman's Kenilworth Productions. The Embezzler stands out from other Kenilworth Productions due to John Gilling's sharp script and direction and the strong performance from character actor Charles Victor as the hapless man who dies a hero. Michael Craig, in an early role, plays the husband of the blackmail victim.

EMMA(Miramax, 1996)—Romance. Director: Douglas McGrath; Producers: Patrick Cassavetti, Steven Haft, Donna Grey (associate), Bob Weinstein (executive), Harvey Weinstein (executive), and Donna Gigliotti (executive); Script:

-120-

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Guide to British Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • A 1
  • B 16
  • C 47
  • D 90
  • E 120
  • F 126
  • G 144
  • H 173
  • I 200
  • J 213
  • K 218
  • L 226
  • M 256
  • N 278
  • O 291
  • P 299
  • Q 311
  • R 313
  • S 331
  • T 353
  • U 373
  • V 375
  • W 378
  • Z 398
  • Appendix: List of Films, Actors, and Directors, 1929-2000 401
  • Selected Bibliography 405
  • Index 411
  • About the Author 441
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