Sargent, Whistler, and Mary Cassatt

By Frederick A. Sweet | Go to book overview

Mary Cassatt

1844 May 22 Born Rebecca St., Allegheny City, Pennsylvania

1846Her father, Robert Simpson Cassatt, mayor of Allegheny City

1847 April 2 Baptized Mary Stevenson Cassatt at Trinity Church, Pittsburgh

1848Moved to corner of Penn Ave. and Marbury St., (Evans Way) Pittsburgh

Later in year moved to " Hardwick," Lancaster County

1849 January 13 J. Gardner Cassatt, youngest brother, born at "Hardwick"

1851 496 West Chestnut St., Philadelphia December Hotel Continental, Paris, witnessed coup d'état of Napoleon III

1851-58 Paris, Heidelberg and Darmstadt

1855 May 25Brother Robbie ( Robert Kelso Cassatt) died at Darmstadt, age 12

1858-62 1436 S. Penn Square, Philadelphia

1863 Paris

1864-65Studied at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

1866 Paris

1869Beaufort en Doran, Savoie

1870-71 Philadelphia, Chicago

1872Eight months at Parma, studied at the Academy with Carlo Raimondi ( 1809-1883) painter and engraver; in Seville, then Belgium and Holland.

Under name of Mary Stevenson showed On the Balcony as her first Salon picture

1873 Paris, met Louisine Waldron Elder (later Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer) and advised her on her first purchase, a Degas pastel

Showed Offrant le Panal au Torero at Salon

1874 Rome

Showed Ida at Paris Salon, favorably commented on by Degas. Showed first two Salon pictures at National Academy, New York

1875Showed Mlle. E. C. at Salon

1876Showed at Salon for last time

1877Her parents and sister Lydia came to Paris to live

Degas invited her to join the Impressionists

1878-84 12 Avenue Trudaine, Paris; studio at 6 Boulevard Clichy

1879Sent Opera Box and one other to Society of American Artists, first impressionist pictures seen in America

Exhibited at Fourth Impressionist Show, La Loge and The Cup of Tea

Summer trip with father to Geneva,Val d'Aosta, Turin, Lake Maggiore, Milan; joined mother at Divonne les Bains

1880Showed at Fifth Impressionist Exhibition

Summer At Marly-le-Roi

Brother Alexander Cassatt and family made first trip abroad

December Spain with her mother and Lydia

1881Showed at Sixth Impressionist Exhibition, Portrait of Lydia

Summer Louveciennes

Gardner Cassatt visits France

1882Following Degas' lead she refused to show at Seventh Impressionist Exhibition

Summer Louveciennes

November 7 Lydia died in Paris

November 8 Alexander Cassatts sailed for Europe

1883 Gardner Cassatt and bride came abroad Painted Lady at the Tea Table (Mrs. Robert Moore Riddle, cousin of Mrs. Cassatt) The first painting to show strong Japanese influence

Louisine Waldron Elder and Henry O. Havemeyer married

1884 JanuarySpain with her mother

-12-

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Sargent, Whistler, and Mary Cassatt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • The Expatriates Return 7
  • Mary Cassatt 12
  • John Singer Sarget 40
  • James Mc. Neill Whistler 74
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Trustees and Officers of The Art Institute of Chicago *
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