Skills of Workplace Communication: A Handbook for TandD Specialists and Their Organizations

By Richard P. Picardi | Go to book overview

Preface and
Acknowledgments

One thing corporate managers, government supervisors, and English professors can all agree on is that the so-called communications revolution has yet to improve the level of communication. In fact, many people question whether there has been a communications revolution at all, or merely a great advance in the channels or technology of communicating. Even the much-trumpeted goal of a computer on every desk has proven to be another quick fix that fixes little or nothing. Machines have added to the quantity of communication, but done little or nothing to improve its quality and effectiveness.

This book is not intended to turn the clock back, but to focus on two underlying facts: not all writing is communication and not all communication is written. The writer of the most routine memo or the most complex report cannot communicate without first thinking clearly about the subject and the receiver. Part of this analysis must increasingly be about cross-cultural dynamics of our diverse and global workplace. Without such clear thinking, negative verbal and non-verbal ideas and emotions are often communicated unintentionally, but with no less damage.

Despite what has just been said, Skills of Workplace Communication is at heart a very optimistic book. It believes that problems have solutions. It believes that thinking and writing skills can be learned or significantly improved. Specifically, this book shows how various writing and communications problems can be solved in a simple, orderly manner using text boxes, checklists, and other tools for improving organization and expression. By following these concrete steps, the writer can achieve the ultimate goal of communication, that is, linking sender, message, and receiver to bring about positive change in the workplace.

-ix-

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