Skills of Workplace Communication: A Handbook for TandD Specialists and Their Organizations

By Richard P. Picardi | Go to book overview

15
Writing and Revising
Indirect or Deferred-Load
Letters For Negative News,
Persuasion, and Sales

Just as there are situations within corporations and government agencies that may be the subject of internal, negative-news memos, there are situations requiring external, negative-news letters. An unsubstantiated claim about a product must be denied. A request for sensitive information must be turned down. Requests for donations to charitable events cannot always be granted. Requests to attend and address meetings cannot always be accepted.

While most people realize that they cannot agree to every request, they still are disappointed when someone turns down their request. Some people give a shrug, adapt, and find someone else or some other way to get their need fulfilled. But others get annoyed, even hostile, when turned down.

Learning how to write a sensitive, empathetic negative-news letter is a very important skill. It might not make the bad news pretty, but it can prevent hard feelings of rejection and a nasty trip down the slippery slope of ill will.

Persuasive and sales letters, while not explicitly carrying bad news, can face a similarly unwelcome reception. For this reason, writers of such letters should use the same indirect pattern that negative-news writers employ, namely, the indirect or deferred load method.

The most important aspect of the indirect pattern is placing the central idea at a later stage in the letter. This is not to suggest that we leave our readers guessing or in the dark at the beginning of negative-

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skills of Workplace Communication: A Handbook for TandD Specialists and Their Organizations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.