Historical Dictionary of Women's Education in the United States

By Linda Eisenmann | Go to book overview

Preface

The Historical Dictionary of Women's Education in the United States is a concise reference tool for researchers, scholars, teachers, students, and laypersons interested in examining significant events, ideas, movements, institutions, and people concerned with the history of women's education in the United States from the colonial period to the present. More an encyclopedia than a dictionary, the book discusses the history of women's education in America through a series of 245 original entries contributed by 104 scholars from the United States and abroad. Each entry defines a subject and explores its significance to women's educational history. When presenting a wide-ranging topic like a biography or a historical movement, the entry emphasizes the particular contributions to education.

Creating a reference book may be, by nature, a conservative activity. That is, the editor is capturing the state of knowledge at a particular point in time and “conserving” it for future use. However, the editor can also hope to alert readers to areas where knowledge is newly growing, where interpretations are changing or contested, and where research is underdeveloped. Selecting entries to cover this range, especially in burgeoning fields like women's history and educational history, poses true intellectual challenges and may, on occasion, present inconsistencies in coverage. For example, Dictionary readers will find an essay on deaf education for women but not one for visually impaired women. Such a discrepancy results because a historian of the hearing-impaired has recently treated the issue of women's education, making an up-to-date scholarly analysis readily available. Similar discrepancies may appear throughout the volume, although by using the index readers can find coverage of topics that did not receive a separate alphabetical entry. For instance, working-class women do not have a separate entry, but their issues receive good coverage in the entries on HullHouse, labor colleges, the Women's Trade Union League, and labor unions.

Several criteria guided selection of topics. First, the volume tries to represent

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Historical Dictionary of Women's Education in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • A 1
  • B 29
  • C 65
  • D 111
  • E 136
  • F 146
  • G 163
  • H 188
  • I 217
  • J 225
  • K 229
  • L 232
  • M 256
  • N 287
  • O 312
  • P 317
  • Q 331
  • R 336
  • S 349
  • T 408
  • U 443
  • V 446
  • W 456
  • Y 494
  • Appendix: Timeline of Women's Educational History in the United States 503
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 511
  • About the Editor and Contributors 525
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