Historical Dictionary of Women's Education in the United States

By Linda Eisenmann | Go to book overview

T

Taba, Hilda. Hilda Taba (1902–1967), a woman of strong leadership and astute scholarship, was a twentieth-century pioneer in curriculum development who contributed conspicuously to major developments in American education. Although her accomplishments were varied and numerous, her collaborators are often better known. Having studied under William Heard Kilpatrick and John Dewey, Taba's educational theories and practices derived from progressive educational philosophy. Taba contributed several important ideas to the curriculum field, many of which remain at the forefront of curriculum discourse and practice.

Born in Estonia, Taba came to the United States in 1926 as a European Fellow at Bryn Mawr College,* where she earned her master's degree. She continued graduate work with a doctorate in educational administration at Teachers College, Columbia University, the center of progressive educational thought in the 1920s and 1930s. There she clearly was influenced by the work not only of Dewey and Kilpatrick but also of renowned scholars such as Harold Rugg, George S. Counts, Edward L. Thorndike, and L. Thomas Hopkins. Her dissertation, “The Dynamics of Education” (1932), provided a comprehensive portrayal of progressive educational thought as well as an analysis of factors that contribute to curriculum development. In 1933, she received a fellowship to pursue postdoctoral work at Syracuse University, and she also began a position as German teacher and curriculum director at the prestigious Dalton School in New York City “see Dalton Plan*”.

Taba's work at Dalton provided her with the opportunity to meet and, eventually, to work with Ralph W. Tyler, research director of the Progressive Education Association's noted Eight-Year Study. An ambitious attempt to excite curriculum reform, the study, with Carnegie Foundation support, enrolled thirty high schools* (one later withdrew) and thousands of students. During the study, colleges suspended other entrance requirements for the study's schools. Con-

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Historical Dictionary of Women's Education in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • A 1
  • B 29
  • C 65
  • D 111
  • E 136
  • F 146
  • G 163
  • H 188
  • I 217
  • J 225
  • K 229
  • L 232
  • M 256
  • N 287
  • O 312
  • P 317
  • Q 331
  • R 336
  • S 349
  • T 408
  • U 443
  • V 446
  • W 456
  • Y 494
  • Appendix: Timeline of Women's Educational History in the United States 503
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 511
  • About the Editor and Contributors 525
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