Dictionary of Media Literacy

By Art Silverblatt; Ellen M. Enright Eliceiri | Go to book overview

B

BAGDIKIAN, BEN. Professor Emeritus and former Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, he has been an active supporter of a free and responsible press. Bagdikian's book The Media Monopoly is considered the classic critique of corporate media control. Other books include In the Midst of Plenty: The Poor in America; Caged; and The Information Machines. See also ECONOMICS, MEDIA

BAZALGETTE, CARY. Principal Education Officer in the Research and Education Division of the British Film Institute (BFI), where she has worked since 1979. Before that she was a teacher of English and filmmaking in London schools and spent six years as a full-time parent Since 1987, Bazalgette has been actively involved in lobbying national bodies to ensure a place for media education in the National Curriculum for England and Wales. In November 1993 she was the director of a public commission of inquiry, which looked at the balance between literature, language, and media in the National Curriculum, the report of which was published by the BFI in 1994. She has also been active in developing teacher-training programs on media education, and was joint leader of a BFI/Open University (OU) course team, which developed a 70–hour distance-learning packet for primary and secondary teachers, Media Education: An Introduction (BFI/OU1991). She was the director of Curriculum 2000, a national conference on education and the moving image, held at BFI, South Bank, London, May 1–2,1996. Bazalgette currently is leading a team of media literacy experts who are writing Mapping Media in the Curriculum, a new basic guide to teaching about the media in

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of Media Literacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acronyms ix
  • Preface xi
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 25
  • D 47
  • E 55
  • F 71
  • G 79
  • H 89
  • I 93
  • J 107
  • K 113
  • L 117
  • M 123
  • N 137
  • O 147
  • P 149
  • Q 163
  • R 165
  • S 169
  • T 181
  • U 189
  • V 195
  • W 201
  • Y,Z 205
  • Appendix: Subject Directory 207
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
  • About the Contributors 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.