Dictionary of Media Literacy

By Art Silverblatt; Ellen M. Enright Eliceiri | Go to book overview

P
PARENTS—STRATEGIES FOR MEDIA LITERACY. Parents make up a primary constituency for media literacy orientation and instruction. Media literacy offers techniques and strategies for helping parents make the most constructive use of the media with their children. The following principles can be employed by parents to help their children attain a critical independence from what they watch on television:You're smarter than your TV: children can—and should—make sense of media messages conveyed through television.The world of TV is not real:
Plots are invented.
Characters are actors.
Incidents are fabricated.
Settings are often constructed.
Programs are broadcast to make money.
Money for programs comes from advertisers purchasing airtime.
Ads are intended to sell products to the viewer.
Audience size determines broadcaster income.

• TV teaches us that some people are more important than others.

• TV keeps doing the same things over and over again. Consequently, it is easy for children to identify patterns with respect to stereotypes, techniques, and messages.

• Somebody's always trying to make money through TV. (Davis, 1991)

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Dictionary of Media Literacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acronyms ix
  • Preface xi
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 25
  • D 47
  • E 55
  • F 71
  • G 79
  • H 89
  • I 93
  • J 107
  • K 113
  • L 117
  • M 123
  • N 137
  • O 147
  • P 149
  • Q 163
  • R 165
  • S 169
  • T 181
  • U 189
  • V 195
  • W 201
  • Y,Z 205
  • Appendix: Subject Directory 207
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
  • About the Contributors 231
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