Dictionary of Media Literacy

By Art Silverblatt; Ellen M. Enright Eliceiri | Go to book overview

U
UNITED STATES, MEDIA LITERACY DEVELOPMENTS IN. Significantly, the United States has lagged behind other nations in the media literacy movement. After media education enjoyed a promising start during the 1970s, the focus of American education shifted toward a “return to basics” in the 1980s. Funding resources became scarce, and many exploratory programs were eliminated. Teachers with an interest in media literacy felt isolated and unsupported by other teachers and administrators. In addition, because the university system offered no curriculum in media literacy, teachers had no systematic approach for the study of media literacy; consequently, teachers often felt uncomfortable teaching the subject The field developed a reputation for a lack of rigor.Media literacy reemerged as a legitimate area of study in the 1990s, for several reasons: 1) the increasing pervasiveness of the media made media literacy more of a national issue; 2) there was increased communication with international scholars and media literacy activists; 3) a national network of media literacy educators and activists developed; and 4) teaching resources and methodologies became available. In November 1991, the Media Commission of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) met at the NCTE conference in Seattle to explore and evaluate a number of issues central to the future of media education in the United States. The Media Commission issued the following recommendations to encourage:
Portfolios of student work that include a wide variety of media forms, as a welcome and healthy trend in teaching and evaluation.
Materials to help teachers address, evaluate, discuss and monitor representations of gender, class, race, age, and ethnic backgrounds in classroom media.

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Dictionary of Media Literacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acronyms ix
  • Preface xi
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 25
  • D 47
  • E 55
  • F 71
  • G 79
  • H 89
  • I 93
  • J 107
  • K 113
  • L 117
  • M 123
  • N 137
  • O 147
  • P 149
  • Q 163
  • R 165
  • S 169
  • T 181
  • U 189
  • V 195
  • W 201
  • Y,Z 205
  • Appendix: Subject Directory 207
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
  • About the Contributors 231
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