Dictionary of Media Literacy

By Art Silverblatt; Ellen M. Enright Eliceiri | Go to book overview

V

VALUES CLARIFICATION APPROACH. A strategy for teaching media literacy that employs the media as a source for reflection about values systems. The Values Clarification approach can follow several lines of inquiry. Media text can be a springboard for discussion about moral dilemmas and the development of moral reasoning. In addition, media presentations can be examined to identify the embedded values of the media communicator. Media content often reflects the value system of the media communicator, as well as widely held cultural values and attitudes. Embedded values may appear in the text through such production techniques as editing decisions, point of view, and connotative words and images.

Another approach involves identifying the value system operating within the world view of a media presentation by focusing on its values hierarchy. Characters can be considered personifications of values. Heroes and heroines epitomize those qualities that society considers admirable. Villains generally represent negative values which threaten this world. As the protagonists and villains engage in conflict, the values that they personify are also in opposition (e.g., Good vs. Evil, Justice vs. Injustice, Truth vs. Falsehood, Love vs. Hate, Internal Satisfaction vs. Material Acquisitions). The resolution of a presentation often establishes a hierarchy of values. As the protagonists move toward a resolution at the conclusion of the program, a clear ordering of values is established. The “good guy” wins, and happiness is restored. The conclusion of a presentation, then, reaffirms values in this media-created world.

Values clarification also provides opportunities to reflect about topics involving media and ethical dilemmas, such as privacy versus the right to know, conflicts of interest, and responsibilities to the public vs. benefit to

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Dictionary of Media Literacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acronyms ix
  • Preface xi
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 25
  • D 47
  • E 55
  • F 71
  • G 79
  • H 89
  • I 93
  • J 107
  • K 113
  • L 117
  • M 123
  • N 137
  • O 147
  • P 149
  • Q 163
  • R 165
  • S 169
  • T 181
  • U 189
  • V 195
  • W 201
  • Y,Z 205
  • Appendix: Subject Directory 207
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
  • About the Contributors 231
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