Restorative Justice and Responsive Regulation

By John Braithwaite | Go to book overview

7
Sustainable Development

JUST AS RESTORATIVE PRACTICES AND THE VALUES OF RESTORATIVE JUSTICE HAVE A useful contribution to make to peace in the world, so they have something to offer the sustainable development that is one of the conditions for that peace. Sustainable development is crucial to peace if we frame it as giving priority to those who have been left behind in the economic struggle—the poor of the developing world. Conceived in this way, sustainable development is a political objective that advances social justice. And as argued in the previous chapter, there can be no enduring peace without social justice. Sustainable development is a political objective at odds with radical green philosophies that reject economic growth. Sustainable development conceives economic growth as crucial to creating jobs for the poor in both developed and developing economies. But it contends that development can be accomplished while reducing the impacts the environment currently endures. There are enough examples now of highly successful corporations that outperform the market while substantially reducing the environmental impact of their production to give us confidence that the environmental stewardship required for sustainable development is possible (Gunningham and Grabosky 1998; Parker forthcoming). Sustainable development is not an oxymoron; it is a coherent objective.

The next section considers the way restorative justice might support a rule of law that promotes sustainable development. Then the chapter considers how restorative justice institutions might make a major contribution to the human and social capital development so crucial to economic growth in the late modern world, then how restorative justice and responsive regulation can contribute to combating corruption, to the integrity of tax systems, to sustainability, to assuring that competition is not corrupted by cartels and monopolies, and to preventing the collapse of national, regional or global financial systems. These are the steps we will take through what the IMF and World Bank regard as the good governance agenda necessary for sustainable development.

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Restorative Justice and Responsive Regulation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • 1: The Fall and Rise of Restorative Justice 3
  • 2: Responsive Regulation 29
  • 3: Does Restorative Justice Work? 45
  • 4: Theories That Might Explain Why Restorative Justice Works 73
  • 5: Worries About Restorative Justice 137
  • 6: World Peacemaking 169
  • 7: Sustainable Development 211
  • 8: Transforming the Legal System 239
  • References 269
  • Index 297
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