CHAPTER 6
CONCLUDING
INTERPRETIVE ESSAY:
THE GLORIOUS CAUSE

The American Revolution (1763–1783) was the Glorious Cause.1 Many of the most cherished hopes of people everywhere came out of the American Revolutionary Epoch. Even today, in the early years of the third millennium of the Christian Era, people still yearn for the freedom, the liberty, and the equality proclaimed over two hundred years ago in what is now venerated as America's most precious Charter of Liberty, the Declaration of Independence. The radical, revolutionary philosophy of the Declaration has remained the beacon of hope that the world's oppressed and exploited aspire to implement.

Specifically, America's commitment to, although not always adherence to, the high ideals of freedom, liberty, equality (“that all men are created equal”), constitutionalism, the sovereignty of the people, and what could be referred to as classical republicanism make the American Revolution truly revolutionary. However, the American Revolution was not of the classical variety (such as were, for example, the French Revolution of the late eighteenth century and the Russian Revolution of 1917) that brought about the almost complete overthrow of the existing political, social, economic, and religious order. Rather, the American Revolution was largely philosophical in its impact. At least originally, the Revolution was a struggle on the part of the colonists to regain rights previously enjoyed or confidently hoped for. This has led many historians to characterize the Revolution as being conservative or evolutionary. However, these consensus or conservative historians neglect to consider the revolutionary nature of the consequences of the revolutionary struggle. What had started out as a family squabble within the British Empire soon became a crusade, on the part of Americans, to overthrow the existing order of monarchy,

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chronology of Events xv
  • Chapter 1 - Narrative Historical Overview 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Road to Revolution 17
  • Chapter 3 - The Necessary War 39
  • Chapter 4 - The Home Front 85
  • Chapter 5 - Revolutionary Diplomacy 97
  • Chapter 6 - Concluding Interpretive Essay: the Glorious Cause 109
  • Biographies 117
  • Documents 171
  • Annotated Bibliography 207
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.