Does God Belong in Public Schools?

By Kent Greenawalt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Morals, Civics, and Comparative Religion

TEACHING MORALITY AND CIVICS

In this chapter, we focus first on the delicate subject of teaching morality and civic responsibility, both on general approaches and on how schools should deal with such controversial topics as sex education. In chapter 2, on educational purposes, we examined how far schools should teach morality, beyond what is relevant to good citizenship. We also asked whether students should be encouraged to deliberate about civic issues apart from their religious convictions, and whether schools should try to counter the negative effects on religious understandings of whatever they teach about civic morality and other aspects of the moral life.

Schools can hardly draw a sharp distinction between civic responsibilities and ordinary morality that concerns relations with other people. Many virtues have civic and noncivic applications. In theory, teachers might be able to distinguish honesty in one's life as a citizen1 from honesty in personal relations and business dealings, but one cannot imagine that encouraging honesty could be very effective if it were limited to a single aspect of life. Much teaching about moral behavior and good citizenship is implicit, in the way classes are run. When a teacher treats boys and girls equally, that sends the message that men and women should not have a sharp division in responsibility and authority, inside civic life or outside.2

Teaching material in a way that suggests appropriate attitudes and actions is not limited to “political” subjects, like the American Revolution; Othello tells us about the dangers of mistrust and jealousy, and inventive geniuses like Thomas Edison are put forward as admirable exemplars.

A final reason why political morality may not be easily distinguished from much of the rest of morality is that we live within a society. How could it not be part of the school's role to teach us to live well together, even in parts of our lives that are not directly civic?

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Does God Belong in Public Schools?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.