The Debate over Slavery: Antislavery and Proslavery Liberalism in Antebellum America

By David F. Ericson | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER 1
1. This period was defined by, on the one hand, the rise of Garrison abolitionism in the North and, on the other, the outbreak of the Civil War.
2. See Louis Hartz, The Liberal Tradition in America: An Interpretation of American Political Thought since the Revolution (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1955). Hartz, of course, did not establish this new paradigm alone, but he now appears preeminent. See J. David Greenstone, The Lincoln Persuasion: Remaking American Liberalism (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1993), p. 38; Daniel T. Rodgers, “Republicanism: The Career of a Concept,” Journal of American History 79, no. 1 (1992): 13–14; Rogers M. Smith, Civic Ideals: Conflicting Visions of Citizenship in U.S. History (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1997), p. 26; James P. Young, Reconsider ing American Liberalism: The Troubled Odyssey of the Liberal Idea (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1996), pp. 2–3.
3. See especially Charles A. Beard, The Rise of American Civilization (New York: Macmillan, 1927).
4. See Bernard Bailyn, The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press, 1967); Gordon S. Wood, The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1969); J. G. A. Pocock, The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1975). For republican revisionism as a paradigm shift, see Peter S. Onuf, “Reflections on the Founding: Constitutional Historiography in Bicentennial Perspective,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d series, 46, no. 2 (1989): 346–47; Rodgers, “Republicanism,” pp. 11–12; Robert E. Shalhope, “Toward a Republican Synthesis: The Emergence of an Understanding of Republicanism in American Historiography,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d series, 29, no. 1 (1972): 49–80; Robert E. Shalhope, “Republicanism and Early American Historiography,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d series, 39, no. 2 (1982): 3–26. Except for Pocock, the republican revisionists generally acknowledge the emergence of a liberal consensus at some later point in American history, certainly by the end of the Civil War.

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The Debate over Slavery: Antislavery and Proslavery Liberalism in Antebellum America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Part I 1
  • 1: The Liberal Consensus Thesis and Slavery 3
  • 2: The Antislavery and Proslavery Arguments 14
  • Part II 37
  • 3: Child, Douglass, and Antislavery Liberalism 39
  • 4: Wendell Phillips Liberty and Union 62
  • Part III 91
  • 5: Dew, Fitzhugh, and Proslavery Liberalism 93
  • 6: James H. Hammond Slavery and Union 121
  • Part IV 155
  • 7: The “house Divided” and Civil-War Causation 157
  • Notes 167
  • Index 235
  • About the Author 241
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