Terrorism and Public Health: A Balanced Approach to Strengthening Systems and Protecting People

By Barry S. Levy; Victor W. Sidel | Go to book overview

4
Addressing environmental health issues

LUZ CLAUDIO, ANJALI GARG, AND PHILIP J. LANDRIGAN

The environmental aspects of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster were extraordinary. Over a million tons of steel, dust, cement, asbestos, and other debris fell to the ground. The enormous heat (up to 2000° F) from the fires and explosions transformed many materials, such as computers, carpeting, furniture, and air conditioning fluid, in the WTC into a gaseous cloud of potentially toxic dust, which took weeks to dissipate1(Figure 4–1).

The six-story-high pile of compacted rubble that resulted from the fires and collapse of the WTC towers became known as the Pile, or Ground Zero. During the first days after September 11, immediate physical dangers were everywhere. Buildings adjacent to the towers collapsed or suffered major damage. Intense fires continued to burn, and a massive cloud of dust and smoke spread with the prevailing winds for miles from the site. For several months after the attack, nearby communities experienced the smell of acrid smoke from the long-burning fires. All of this devastation occurred in the middle of an intensely populated urban center.

Lower Manhattan encompasses not only a vibrant working community, but also a significant residential neighborhood. Nearly 20,000 people live within one-half-mile of Ground Zero; almost 3, 000 of them are children.2When the WTC was destroyed, the communities of lower Manhattan were enveloped in smoke and soot. All residents were placed at risk of exposure to poten-

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorism and Public Health: A Balanced Approach to Strengthening Systems and Protecting People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 377

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.