Diet, Life Expectancy, and Chronic Disease: Studies of Seventh-Day Adventists and Other Vegetarians

By Gary E. Fraser | Go to book overview

13
Risk Factors and Disease
among Vegans

Vegans avoid all animal products in their diet, even eggs and dairy products. The reason for these choices is often animal rights rather than the expectation of better health. One might, however, predict that certain risk factors would have even more favorable values for vegans than for lactoovo vegetarians since the intake of saturated fats, cholesterol, and sodium is lower still in vegans, and their consumption of dietary fiber and potassium is greater. If a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet is beneficial, do vegans gain even further benefits? Evidence that addresses this question is presented in this chapter.

My intention is not to establish the nutritional adequacy of the vegan diet in terms of recommended daily allowances for nutrients and vitamins, but, in keeping with the rest of this book, to focus on the risk for common chronic diseases. However, a vegan diet is nutritionally adequate if certain precautions are taken (see Chapter 15), and these have been succinctly reviewed by the American Dietetic Association (ADA Reports, 1997).

In comparison with lacto-ovo vegetarians, vegans, in some settings at least, consume less total energy and generally obtain a greater percentage of calories from carbohydrates, and less from fats (particularly saturated fats), and show a higher ratio of dietary polyunsaturated fats to saturated fatty acids (Famodu et al., 1999; Li et al., 1999; Toohey et al., 1998). In addition, vegan diets contain very little vitamin B12 without supplements (Rauma et al., 1995a), but the level of fiber and folate consumption is often high, especially if expressed as a percentage of calories (Famodu et al., 1999; Roshanai and Sanders, 1984; Toohey et al., 1998). Intake of antioxidant vitamins, and their serum levels, may be much higher in vegans than in omnivores (Rauma et al., 1995b), but it is not certain whether there are consistent differences between vegans and lacto-ovo vegetarians (Toohey et al., 1998).

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diet, Life Expectancy, and Chronic Disease: Studies of Seventh-Day Adventists and Other Vegetarians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 371

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.