Mercy, Mercy Me: African-American Culture and the American Sixties

By James C. Hall | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
MEDITATIONS

JOHN COLTRANE AND FREEDOM

We live in a time of massive social breakdown, and this breakdown
is related in the breakdown of the forms of art. European art forms
have afforded the black artist useful media of expression, and all
European forms, creative and performing, have been mastered to
the point of excellence by at least a few black artists. However, all of
the writings of Ellison, Jones, Baldwin, et al., all of the paintings of
Lawrence, do not weigh as much as one John Coltrane solo in terms
of the force of its thrust, the honesty of its statement, and in the
originality of its form.

A.B. SPELLMAN, “Not Just Whistling Dixie” (1968)1

I've found you've got to look back at the old things and see them in
a new light. I'm not finished with these studies because I haven't as-
similated everything into my playing.… I want to progress, but I
don't want to go so far out that I can't see what others are doing.

JOHN COLTRANE (1960)2

In May 1957, John Coltrane's life changed. His career had progressed steadily but—it was whispered—his abuse of drugs and alcohol was making him a risk. While Miles Davis knew that Coltrane could be the sideman to provide him with a lifetime's worth of musical challenges, he was increasingly concerned that Coltrane simply did not embarrass him on the bandstand by nodding off to sleep. In some ways it was fundamentally perplexing. This was—everyone agreed—a young man who was going places. Moreover, he was positively driven toward mastery of his instrument and jazz tradition. Why get caught up in the madness of heroin? There are no adequate answers, really. Some have speculated that he had begun using it to get relief from physical pain, perhaps dental pain, the product of both excessive practicing and an out-of-control sweet tooth. As satisfying an answer, however, may be that heroin was just around and had become, however irrationally, part of the jazz scene. As “work,” playing jazz meant nightlife which meant alcohol

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mercy, Mercy Me: African-American Culture and the American Sixties
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.