France: The Dark Years, 1940-1944

By Julian Jackson | Go to book overview

that I wanted to write a short book about Vichy, he told me that I should think about writing something more ambitious. I am glad that I followed his advice, but if readers find this book too long, he must share part of the blame. Thanks also to Ruth Parr, Tony Morris's successor at OUP, for continuing to back a project that was not originally her own, to Michael Watson for seeing it through the production process, and to Rowena Anketell for her extraordinarily efficient copy-editing. Much of the research for this book was carried out in the library of the Institut d'histoire du temps présent, and I am especially grateful for the helpfulness of the librarian Jean Astruc. I would also like to thank the staff of the BDIC library at Nanterre. One beneficial side-effect of the last stages of my research was that I even came to appreciate, if not to love, the new Bibliothèque de France: perhaps affection will come with time. I would also like to record my thanks to David Eastwood, my head of Department, who has given my work on this book such support, and has managed in our Department to preserve such a civilized and good humoured working atmosphere even in this unpleasant period of Blairo-Thatcherite permanent revolution in British universities.

I would also like to thank Frank Cherbé for his encouragement and for providing me with huge amounts of material about the reporting of the Papon trial in France. Eleanor Breuning was kind enough to help me proof read the entire text: her heroic efforts saved me from numerous solecisms. Three people kindly read the manuscript at earlier stages. Patrick Higgins read quite a lot of an early draft. His careful reading showed me how much more work there was to be done. But my debt to Patrick is much deeper than that. I have learnt so much from him in our twenty years of friendship, and one day I hope I will know half as much history as he does. Roderick Kedward read the whole of the finished manuscript and made numerous helpful suggestions. His encouragement has been very important to me, and the stimulus which his work and inspiration has given to the study of Vichy and the French Resistance in Britain is quite incalculable. Kevin Passmore read the manuscript at too late a stage to be able to make many detailed comments, but I tried to take on board those suggestions which he did permit himself to make. More generally, however, he has taught me a huge amount about inter-war French politics both in his writing and in our many conversations. Having him as a colleague in a university close to my own has been very important.

Finally, and most importantly, I would like to thank Douglas who has lived in closer proximity to this book than he would probably have liked at times. Unfortunately there are few activities that render one more self-centred and selfish than writing a book. I shall try harder to overcome this next time, but in the meantime I can only record my heartfelt gratitude for everything that 1 owe him.

Swansea, July 2000

-viii-

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France: The Dark Years, 1940-1944
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Maps and Figure xvi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction: Historians and the Occupation 1
  • Part I - Anticipations 21
  • 1: The Shadow of War: Cultural Anxieties and Modern Nightmares 27
  • 2: Rethinking the Republic: 1890-1934 43
  • 3: Class War/Civil War 65
  • 4: The German Problem 81
  • 5: The Daladier Moment: Prelude to Vichy or Republican Revival? 97
  • 6: The Debacle 112
  • Part II - The Regime: National Revolution and Collaboration 137
  • 7: The National Revolution 142
  • 8: Collaboration 166
  • 9: Collaborationism 190
  • 10: Laval in Power: 1942–1943 213
  • Part III - Vichy, the Germans, and the French People 237
  • 11: Propaganda, Policing, and Administration 246
  • 12: Public Opinion, Vichy, and the Germans 272
  • 13: Intellectuals, Artists, and Entertainers 300
  • 14: Reconstructing Mankind 327
  • 15: Vichy and the Jews 354
  • Part IV - The Resistance 383
  • 16: The Free French 1940-1942 389
  • 17: The Resistance 1940-1942 402
  • 18: De Gaulle and the Resistance 1942 427
  • 19: Power Struggles 1943 447
  • 20: Resistance in Society 475
  • 21: Remaking France 506
  • Part V - Liberation and After 525
  • 22: Towards Liberation: January to June 1944 529
  • 23: Liberations 544
  • 24: A New France? 570
  • Epilogue: Remembering the Occupation 601
  • Appendix: The Camps of Vichy France 633
  • Bibliographical Essay 637
  • Index 647
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