The Antitrust Revolution: Economics, Competition, and Policy

By John E. Kwoka Jr.; Lawrence J. White | Go to book overview

CASE 14
Technology Cross-Licensing Practices:
FTCv. Intel(1999)

Carl Shapiro


INTRODUCTION

When do hardball negotiating tactics constitute violations of the antitrust laws? Consider the following fact pattern, which reflects real-world events during the 1997–1998 time frame:

Intel is the leading manufacturing of high-end microprocessors, the brains
of personal computers and workstations. Intergraph Corporation makes
computer workstations that use Intel's microprocessors. Intel gives Inter-
graph, a valued customer, access to Intel's trade secrets (which are very
useful when building computers based on Intel's chips) and advance sam-
ples of new Intel microprocessors.

Intergraph sues Intel, asserting that Intel's microprocessors infringe on In-
tergraph's patents. As negotiations fail, the relationship between Intel and
Intergraph deteriorates. Intel withdraws the special benefits that Intergraph
had been enjoying. Intergraph asserts that Intel has monopoly power over
the supply of microprocessors, that Intel's withdrawal of these benefits
will greatly damage Intergraph's business, and that Intel's conduct is anti-
competitive. Intel claims that its commercial response to Intergraph's law-
suit does not harm competition in any relevant market and that the Courts
should not intervene to favor Intergraph in their patent dispute.

Is Intel's conduct anticompetitive and thus illegal under the antitrust laws? That is the central question explored in this chapter.

The author served as an expert witness of behalf of Intel in the litigation brought by the FTC
against Intel, which is the subject of this case study. The views expressed here are those of the au-
thor alone and should not be attributed in any way to the Intel Corporation.

-350-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Antitrust Revolution: Economics, Competition, and Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 527

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.