The Long Sexual Revolution: English Women, Sex, and Contraception, 1800-1975

By Hera Cook | Go to book overview

13
'Truly it Felt Like Year One':
The English Sexual Revolution

In the late 1960s, many young women believed that a sexual revolution was taking place. The novelist Angela Carter wrote that by 1969 'the introduction of more or less 100 per cent effective methods of birth control, combined with the relaxation of manners that may have derived from this technological innovation or else came from God knows where, changed, well, everything'.1 Margaret Drabble, another novelist, said in theGuardian that 'we face the certainty of a sexual revolution, and [this]… is caused largely by the development of contraceptive techniques … This freedom is evidently connected to that other major revolution of our society, the emancipation of women.'2 But, by the early 1980s, the idea that a sexual revolution had taken place was being treated with scepticism, and historians including, for example, Jeffrey Weeks and Jane Lewis have consistently argued that heterosexual sexual behaviour remained conservative during the 1960s.3 The only measurable change occurring in sexual behaviour was the rising incidence of premarital

1 A. Carter, 'Truly, It Felt like Year One', in S. Maitland (ed.), Very Heaven: Looking Back at the
1960s
(1988), 213–14.

2 M. Drabble, Guardian (10 Nov. 1967). See also C. White, Women's Magazines 1693–1968
(1970), 163.

3 J. Weeks, Sex, Politics and Society: The Regulation of Sexuality since 1800 (1981; 1989), 254. J. Lewis,
Women in Britain since
1945 (1992), 48. See also L. V. Marks, Sexual Chemistry: A History of the
Contraceptive Pill
(2001), 3. E. R. Watkins has argued that the pill did not cause the sexual
revolution in the USA. She used a limited range of sources and did not look at young
women's behaviour in detail; however, the argument made here would have to be
considere in the light of the specific US circumstances. E. R. Watkins, On the Pill: A Social
History of Oral Contraceptives in America, 1950–1970
(1998).

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Long Sexual Revolution: English Women, Sex, and Contraception, 1800-1975
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 412

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.