Making Nature Sacred: Literature, Religion, and Environment in America from the Puritans to the Present

By John Gatta | Go to book overview

9

Reclaiming the Sacred
Commons

The Gifted Land of Wendell Berry

Exotic nature writing need not display disdain or indifference toward life on the writer s home ground. But it invariably expresses the reactions of an itinerant observer. Another significant strain of American environmental writing presents the settled resident s account ofa particular locale. Familiar instances would be Henry Thoreau's Walden, or Edwin Way Teale's book A Naturalist Buys an Old Farm(1974). Instead of recounting his solitary trip into some majestic wilderness, Teale tells of settling with his wife in a quiet corner of northeastern Connecticut. There, toward the close of his career as naturalist writer, he devotes himself to sauntering with “Nellie” through the ordinary but companionable fields and woods of a former farm.

In present-day America, the voluminous prose writings of Wendell Berry epitomize this home watching brand of environmental literature. Like other works considered in this chapter, Berry's nonfiction also denies the Romantic solitary s view of nature as a functionally private arena of self-transcendence. That human community should be viewed as an integral member of nature s ecological “household” is a persistent theme of Berry's writing and also figures conspicuously in Gary Snyder's vision of bioregionalism. In fact, all the writers discussed in these final chapters perceive a need to deepen our culture's sense of environmental reverence. And they generally understand this virtue of reverence to embrace a spiritual component, as well as a concern for social justice across the common landscape of North America. It is sometimes assumed that serious literature of the postmodern era must deny all transmaterial

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Nature Sacred: Literature, Religion, and Environment in America from the Puritans to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 291

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.