Making Nature Sacred: Literature, Religion, and Environment in America from the Puritans to the Present

By John Gatta | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1. Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises(New York: Scribner's, 1926, 1954), p.245.
2. Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun, in The Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne, ed. William Charvat et al. (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1968), 4:3.
3. J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer and Sketches of Eighteenth-Century America(New York: Penguin, 1981), p. 76.
4. Thomas Cole, “Essay on American Scenery,” in American Art, 17001960: Sources and Documents, ed. John W. McCoubrey (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1965), pp. 102, 100.
5. One informed and frequently cited account of the word s manifold meanings appears in Raymond Williams, Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society(New York: Oxford University Press, 1976), pp. 184-189.
6. By “strangeness” I mean a quality of otherness surpassing human understanding. Nature itselfis thus understood to bear a power of “defamiliarisation,” or making things strange, comparable to that which the Russian Formalist Victor Shklovsky attributed to art. See Raman Selden, A Reader's Guide to Contemporary Literary Theory(New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1985; 2nd ed. 1989), pp. 10–11.
7. Perry Miller, Nature's Nation(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1967), p. 203. Among the many noteworthy books in this vein are Henry Nash Smith, Virgin Land: The American West as Symbol and Myth(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1950), R.W.B. Lewis, The American Adam: Innocence, Tragedy and Tradition in the Nineteenth Century(Chicago; University of Chicago Press, 1955), Leo Marx, The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral Ideal in America(New York; Oxford University Press, 1964), Roderick Nash, Wilderness and the American Mind(New Haven: Yale University Press, 1967), and Peter N. Carroll, Puritanism and the Wilderness (New York; Columbia University Press, 1969).

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