Latin Poetry and the Judgment of Taste: An Essay in Aesthetics

By Charles Martindale | Go to book overview

INDEX OF SUBJECTS
accommodation 138–9
Aeneid (Virgil):
and Augustan ideology 139–40
Catullus and 77–8, 91, 92, 97–8
Lucan and 219–20, 233–4
Ovid and 203–4
aesthetic autonomy 26, 122
aesthetic criticism 3, 60, 167, 179
Pater and 25, 49 n. 152, 50, 163–5, 170–7, 237
aesthetic determinability 160
aesthetic idea 121, 205, 210
aesthetic judgements 18, 217
Aesthetic Movement 2, 118, 180: see also art for art's sake
aesthetic preference 108
aesthetic present 27
aestheticism 114–15
aesthetics 8–9, 13, 25, 62, 158–65, 182
classics and 10–11
and gender 27–8, 33–9
left and right 119–20
Marxist 120–2
and materialism 122
and politics 12, 25–6, 129, 224–5, 219, 228
After Ovid: New Metamorphoses 202–3, 208–9, 214–15
Alexandrianism 144
alienation 161
allegory 68, 71
in Eclogues 141, 146, 148–50
in Lucan 222
in Propertius 103–5
Shankman and 138–9
amoebean poems 155
Anti-Lucretius in Lucretius 190, 194–5
apostrophe 231, 232
appropriation 138–9
Arrangement in Grey and Black (Whistler) 55–7, 71
art 30–1, 115, 168–9
Adorno on 127
autonomy of 60, 101, 109–16, 120–2, 127, 128, 182
beginnings of 8–9
definition of 128–9
Marx on 120–1
Marxism and 121–2, 161
and morality 27, 110–11
and time 127–8
transcendence of 128–9
art for art's sake 50, 60, 109–11, 182, 227
and Catullus 64: 92
and formalism 60
Gautier on 50–1, 57
libel cases 111–14
see also Aesthetic Movement
art theories 108–9
asymmetry 76, 93
ataraxia 190, 197
Augustan ideology:
Aeneid and 139–40
Odes and 131–3
autobiography 176, 177
autonomy of art 60, 101, 109–16, 120–2, 127, 128, 182
Bauhaus 22 n. 59
beauty 9, 10, 14–21, 39, 110–11
dependent 17–18,19, 24
free 15, 17, 19
Hume on 17, 19
pure 25, 63, 168
Scarry on 29–30
belief, problem of 184–5

-261-

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Latin Poetry and the Judgment of Taste: An Essay in Aesthetics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Prologue 1
  • 1: Immanuel Kant and Aesthetic Judgement 8
  • 2: Content, Form, and Frame 55
  • 3: Distinguishing the Aesthetic: Politics and Art 108
  • 4: The Aesthetic Turn: Latin Poetry and Aesthetic Criticism 167
  • Epilogue 237
  • Bibliography 239
  • Index of Names 257
  • Index of Subjects 261
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