2
The Early Years
Roscelin of Compiègne and
William of Champeaux

Abelard was born into a family of mixed ancestry living on the frontier of Brittany adjacent to the territory of the dukes of Anjou. While his mother, Lucia, was Breton by birth, his father, Berengar, was a Poitevin who encouraged Abelard to look eastward to pursue his education.1 Mentioning nothing of his mother or sisters, Abelard recalls in the Historia calamitatum that he benefited from the encouragement to study given by his father, who encouraged all his sons to pursue an education before learning how to wield arms, and that he then decided to renounce his rightful inheritance as eldest son and devote himself to study: “I abandoned completely the court of Mars, so that I could be brought up in the bosom of Minerva.”2 The impression that he gives in the Historia calam itatum of being a wandering scholar who studied in a variety of places before he came to Paris is misleading. We gain a different picture from a vitriolic letter written by Roscelin of Compiègne, accusing his former pupil of forgetting how much benefit Abelard had gained from his early studies, “from being a boy to being a young man.”3 Roscelin boasted that he held canonries not just at Tours and Loches, “where you sat for so long as the least of my disciples,” but also at Besançon, an important imperial city in Burgundy, near the Alps. He even claimed the support of Rome, “which willingly receives me and listens to me.” Roscelin embodied a new type of teacher in the late eleventh century, a secular cleric, free to travel to wherever his educational services were in demand. He provided the young Peter Abelard with a role model to emulate. While

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abelard and Heloise
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Great Medieval Thinkers ii
  • Abelard and Heloise iii
  • Series Foreword v
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1: Images of Abelard and Heloise 7
  • 2: The Early Years Roscelin of Compiègne and William of Champeaux 21
  • 3: Challenging Tradition the Dialectica 43
  • 4: Heloise and Discussion About Love 58
  • 5: Returning to Logica 81
  • 6: The Trinity 101
  • 7: A Christian Theologia 123
  • 8: Heloise and the Paraclete 145
  • 9: Ethics, Sin, and Redemption 174
  • 10: Faith, Sacraments, and Charity 204
  • 11: Accusations of Heresy 226
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.